Drugs in the news

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  • Yes to marijuana ballot measures

    Alaska, Oregon and the District of Columbia should legalize pot
    The New York Times (US)
    Sunday, October 5, 2014

    The decision by California voters in 1996 to legalize medical marijuana produced a wave of similar initiatives around the country. Less than two decades later, over half the states allow at least limited medical use. Now it looks as though recreational use of the drug may follow the same path. In 2012, Washington State and Colorado legalized recreational marijuana. This November, voters in Alaska, Oregon and the District of Columbia will decide whether to do the same — effectively disregarding the misguided federal ban on a drug that is far less dangerous than alcohol.

  • Huge majority thinks 'war on drugs' has failed, new poll finds

    Observer survey shows an increasing number of Britons want illegal drugs decriminalised
    The Observer (UK)
    Sunday, October 5, 2014

    An increasing proportion of Britons favours a more liberal approach to drugs and would support decriminalisation strategies, according to a comprehensive survey commissioned by the Observer. An overwhelming majority believes that the so-called "war on drugs" is futile, with 84% saying that the decades-long campaign by law enforcement agencies against the global narcotics trade can never be won. The proportion of Britons who believe certain drugs should be decriminalised has risen from 27% to 39% since 2008. (See also: Britain divided: how we really feel about drugs)

  • Cabinet approves changes to ganja law

    The Gleaner (Jamaica)
    Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

    JamaicaJusticeMinAccepting that aspects of the Dangerous Drugs Act prohibit Jamaica from enjoying the economic benefits of medical marijuana and industrial hemp, the Government has made a number of changes to the act. Justice Minister Mark Golding announced that among the amendments to the act that Cabinet has approved are provisions for permits to cultivate, possess, import, export, transport, manufacture, sell, and distribute ganja for medical and scientific purposes under licence.

  • Law to be amended to facilitate medical ganja industry

    Jamaica Observer (Jamaica)
    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

    Mark-Golding_JamaicaThe Government of Jamaica has drafted legislation to amend the Dangerous Drugs Act as it moves to establish medical ganja and industrial hemp industries, where the cultivation and other activities involved in the production and supply of the plants will be legal under a controlled regime. Minister of Justice Senator Mark Golding emphasized that the objective is to lay the foundations for the establishment of regulatory regimes to govern the cultivation and use of ganja for medical and scientific purposes, as well as non-medical industrial hemp.

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